electronic

New Artist: Dam Mantle

Tom Marshallsay a.k.a. Dam Mantle has been making big waves in the Electronic music scene the last few months after releasing the We EP, out on his own label Get Me!. His eclectic mix of gloomy pads, pitched down vocals and skittish 808 drum hits makes for some really haunted vibes, somewhere in between Burial and James Blake. You can grab the EP here – we really insist on it actually. Check out Not A Word below and you’ll see why!

Artist Spotlight: DJ iZem

Co-founder of internet world-music radio station Groovalizacion, DJ iZem has now turned his hand to producing his own. Turns out he’s rather good. Exposed to so many different musical cultures at Groovilicion, it’s no surprise that Debaixo D’Agua, his debut EP released this month, is an eclectic affair. Full of energy, it effortlessly blends dub, soul, hip-hop, Brazilian, post-dubstep…

New Artist: Youngteam

Yesterday, sonic chameleon Travis Stewart (aka Machinedrum and one half of Sepalcure) tweeted the sounds of star pupil Will Johnson (Youngteam) from The New School in New York. Taking influences from Samiyam, Bonobo, Boxcutter and of course both of Travis Stewart’s projects, 19 year old protégé Youngteam has climbed aboard the fast moving ship of loose Garage in a vast ocean of Electronic music. Being a guitarist has pushed his sound into new quarters, with track Seasondeux fusing an acoustic guitar riff with ambient chords, spaced-out arpeggiators and rolling drum hits, in a similar vain to Mount Kimbie. The track is utterly absorbing and we can only dare you to listen below and not get pulled into its nebulous atmosphere. Lets hope we get more of the same in the coming months.

Jai Paul – BTSTU

Jai Paul has to be one of the most enigmatic artists in new music. Since the incomparable BTSTU blew up on the blogosphere last year, Jai has signed to XL Recordings and was long-listed in the BBC Sound of 2011. Yet no more than this is known about him: he’s 22, from north-west London and he’s displayed three disapprovals of his music on his Myspace. How wrong those critics are. Like nothing you’ve ever heard, there really is no easy way to pigeonhole BTSTU; The Guardian’s Paul Lester perhaps does the best job, describing it as J Dilla remixing Hot Chip. Made through a combination of manipulated samples, beats and harmonies, BTSTU shouldn’t work, but it just does. We would recommend you monitor Jai closely for more information or music in the future, but there really is no second-guessing him.